SS George E. Badger Areas With Asbestos Exposure

The SS George E. Badger was a Liberty Ship built in the United States during World War II. It was named after George Edmund Badger, a US Senator from North Carolina and Secretary of the Navy in 1841. The ship was built in December 1942 and by the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company and then acquired by the Navy. The SS George E. Badger was one of the ships that took part in the invasion of Normandy, Operation Overlord, in June 1944.

The ship survived the war and was scrapped in 1972. With millions of microscopic fibers, asbestos can easily break apart and become airborne and possibly inhaled. Should asbestos fibers be inhaled, they may get stuck in the lungs and irritate lung tissues potentially leading to cancer development. Because asbestos fibers travel so easily through the air, not only the person working with asbestos-containing products but also bystanders run the risk of inhaling these fibers and developing an asbestos-related disease even decades after the exposure.

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