USS Stag (AW-1) Areas With Asbestos Exposure

The USS Stag (AW-1) was one of four water distilling ships commissioned by the U.S. Navy for service in World War II. The ship was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract by Delta Shipbuilding Company of New Orleans, Louisiana, as SS Norman O. Pedrick, on 13 November 1943, and launched on 7 January 1944. She was placed in commission the same day as USS Stag (IX-128) with Lieutenant Emery A. Winckler in command. The ship was transferred to the Maritime Commission for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at James River, Fort Eustis, Virginia and renamed SS Norman O. Pedrick, and ultimately scrapped in 1970 at Burriana, Spain. The USS Stag (AW-1), like many other Liberty ships, contained a huge amount of asbestos. Asbestos-containing materials were extensively used in boilers, turbines, pumps, gaskets, valves, cement, adhesives and pipe coverings. Navy personnel were exposed to the mineral while working in tight quarters with poor ventilation allowing asbestos fibers to accumulate in the air and then easily inhaled. Navy personnel were exposed to the mineral while working in tight quarters with poor ventilation which allowed the accumulation of asbestos fibers into the air, easily inhaled and carried into the lower regions of the lung where they can cause cancer.

High risk of asbestos exposure

  • Engine Rooms
  • Damage Control Room
  • Pump Room
  • Propulsion Room

Medium risk of asbestos exposure

  • Powder and Shot Magazine
  • Ward Room

Low risk of asbestos exposure

Questions about asbestos exposure? We can help!

Shipmates on USS Stag (AW-1)

CHESTER RAYMOND DUDEK

unknown age

Uncertain N/A

BILLY FORTSON GHEESLING

90 years old

Dead

WILLIAM PETER KALE

unknown age

Uncertain N/A

JAMES CHARLES MACCHIO

unknown age

Uncertain N/A

JAMES HARRIS BLACK

unknown age

Uncertain N/A

ROBERT THOMAS JONES

93 years old

Dead

JOSEPH A. SANTORO

89 years old

Dead