SS Robert Lansing Areas With Asbestos Exposure

The SS Robert Lansing was a Liberty ship built at J.A. Jones Construction, Panama City, Florida, during World War II. She was named after Robert Lansing, an American lawyer and high government official who served as Counselor to the State Department at the outbreak of World War I, and then as United States Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson from 1915 to 1920. The ship was laid down on 3 June 1943, under a Maritime Commission contract, and launched on 17 July 1943. Due to its insulating abilities and fire- and corrosion-proof properties, asbestos was used in Navy ships for decades. Asbestos-containing materials could be found in nearly every part of each ship from boiler rooms to sleeping quarters. The constant repairs or renovations of the ships favored the release of asbestos fibers into the air, increasing the exposure and the risk of navy servicemen developing severe asbestos-related conditions. On 24 March 1967, the SS Robert Lansing was sold for to Union Minerals & Alloys Corp., for scrapping. She was removed from the fleet one month later.

High risk of asbestos exposure

  • Engine Rooms
  • Damage Control Room
  • Pump Room
  • Propulsion Room

Medium risk of asbestos exposure

  • Powder and Shot Magazine
  • Ward Room

Low risk of asbestos exposure

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Shipmates on SS Robert Lansing

FRANK J. KANE SR.

unknown age

Uncertain N/A

JOHN CARMEN PANELLA

unknown age

Uncertain N/A