USS Armadillo (IX-111) Areas With Asbestos Exposure

The USS Armadillo (IX-111) was a tanker-type Liberty ship built at California Shipbuilding Corporation, Terminal Island, Los Angeles, California, during World War II. She was laid down on 24 September 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract, launched on 26 October 1943 and placed in commission on 18 November 1943 with Lieutenant Michael R. Meyer in command. During World War II, the USS Armadillo (IX-111) was assigned to Service Force, Pacific Fleet and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto, from 14 April to 30 June 1945. When the courageous men and women of the U.S. Navy signed up to put their lives on the line, asbestos exposure was not part of the bargain. The primary route of asbestos entry into the body is through inhalation of air containing asbestos fibers. Since these fibers are so small, they can travel deep into a person’s lungs, where they may eventually lodge in the lung tissue causing several serious diseases such as asbestosis, mesothelioma, lung cancer, pleural disease and other forms of cancer including laryngeal, pharyngeal, stomach and colorectal cancers.

High risk of asbestos exposure

  • Engine Rooms
  • Damage Control Room
  • Pump Room
  • Propulsion Room

Medium risk of asbestos exposure

  • Powder and Shot Magazine
  • Ward Room

Low risk of asbestos exposure

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Shipmates on USS Armadillo (IX-111)

LEONARD LEROY BAHR

94 years old

Dead